JOURNAL OF INTERNAL DISPLACEMENT

...for displaced people everywhere

ATTENTION: Please note that our email address has changed to internaldisplacement [at] gmail [dot] com. As at today, 20 December 2014 ALL correspondence should be directed to internaldisplacement [at] gmail [dot] com. Thank you.

PUBLICATIONS BY JID EDITORS

Migrants Remittances in South Asia
Social, Economic and Political Implications
By Ahsan Ullah (Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Internal Displacement)
 
Asian Immigrants in North America with HIV/AIDS
Stigma, Vulnerabilities and Human Rights
By Ahsan Ullah (Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Internal Displacement)
 
Refugee Politics in the Middle East and North Africa
Human Rights, Safety, and Identity
By Ahsan Ullah (Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Internal Displacement)
 
 

Gender, Conflict and Peace in Kashmir - Invisible Stakeholders

By Seema Shekhawat (Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Internal Displacement)
 
 

The Kampala Convention and its Contribution to International Law

Legal Analyses and Interpretations of the African Union Convention on the Protection and Assistance of IDPs 
By Mehari Taddele Maru (Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Internal Displacement)

            CALL FOR PAPER (SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JULY 2014)

UNDERSTANDING ISRAELI PRACTICES OF FORCED

DISPLACEMENT AND SETTLER COLONIALISM IN

THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES 

Guest Editor: Lamya Hussain***

*JULY 2014 EDITION*

Submission Deadline (EXTENDED): 1 MAY 2014 (CLOSED)

(NB: General submissions are accepted alongside Special Issue)

Download CFP 

Emerging literature on Palestine studies continues to explore the policies and practices of Israel in forcefully displacing Palestinians from their lands. Recent scholarship has placed an emphasis on the West Bank and East Jerusalem area where an estimated 44,100 Palestinians that live across 130 villages in Area C are at high risk of systematic displacement and require humanitarian assistance as a direct result of on-going demolitions.  Further, Palestinian communities continue to live in the context of daily violence or risk of violence through military orders, firing zones, retroactive taxes and inequitable distribution of local resources that impact community and individual livelihoods. 

In East Jerusalem, Israeli authorities have demolished more than 670 Palestinian buildings and structures between the years of 2000 to 2008. An approximate 28 per cent of Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem are currently at risk of being demolished, which means some 60,000 residents face the possibility of forced displacement. Home demolitions, eviction orders and land confiscation policies are key contributing factors towards the ongoing forced displacement and loss of livelihoods for Palestinian communities. However, other tactics are also employed by the state of Israel including denying residency rights and family reunification to Palestinians in an attempt to systematically force communities from East Jerusalem areas. 

In an attempt to document the impact of Israeli policies on Palestinian livelihoods this issue will deal with the trauma and devastation faced by communities through on-going evictions and demolition orders that forcefully displace Palestinian communities in Area C and East Jerusalem. This special issue seeks to examine histories, narratives, and the daily experiences of communities that currently face forced displacement or have been displaced as a result of settler-colonial practices of the state of Israel. In documenting the narratives, this issue aims to present the legal tools employed by Israel to systematically displace Palestinians in Area C and East Jerusalem. Further, the issue will seek papers that highlight the socio-economic and political motivations that inspire shifts in geographies and population transfer induced to maintain hegemonic control/access of resources (land and water) and population dynamics. Submissions and case studies that detail the impact of Israeli policies and practices of forced displacement are also invited to participate. 

It is against this backdrop that JID seeks to stimulate inclusive and discursive dialogue from interested scholars, practitioners, and policy makers around the nature, characteristics, and experiences of forced migration and displacement across Palestinian territories with an emphasis on Area C and East Jerusalem. 

We invite submissions that examine and investigate diverse perspectives on the above issues with respect to the following list of themes: 

  • Settler-Colonialism
  • War and Conflict
  • Environment, Conflict, and Displacement
  • Peace-building and State-building 
  • International Relations and Peace Process
  • Gender, Military Occupation, and Migration
  • Non-Governmental Organizations, Humanitarian Assistance, and Protection 
  • Donor Patterns and Donor Dependency 
  • Oslo I, Oslo II, and The Paris Protocol 

Submission Guidelines:

Articles: 20-30 pages (10,000-15,000 words) single space, Times New Roman, 12 point font size with 150 words abstract and 5 keywords;

Book Review: 3-4 pages (1500 ? 2500 words)

Commentaries: 6-8 pages (3000 ? 4000 words)

  • JID accepts all reference styles as long as they are standard and consistent
  • Submission must be original (not published elsewhere) and in Microsoft word
  • Submit a one-page cover letter with author?s name, address, email, phone number and 200 words (max) biography

Email submission to:   internaldisplacement@gmail.com no later than 1 MAY 2014.

For more information see the ?Author?s Guidelines? by visiting: http://journalinternaldisplacement.webs.com/

Download CFP 


[1] Area C is the area of the West Bank that is under full Israeli civil and military control and comprises approximately 61% of the West BankPopulation figures in Area C are difficult to estimate as the division of the West Bank into Areas A,B, and C do not reflect or take into account boundaries of existing population centres, with the result that towns and villages rarely fall entirely within one area. See UN OCHA, Special Focus: ? Lack of Permit? Demolitions and Resultant Displacement in Area C, 2008.  

***Lamya Hussain is a PhD Candidate at SOAS with the Department of Development Studies. She holds a Masters in Environmental Studies and a Graduate Diploma in Refugee Studies from York University. Lamya has dedicated several years towards researching Palestinian refugee communities across Lebanon and the West Bank. Her areas of expertise include design and implementation of projects that merge local capacities, needs and resources. Her professional career comprises applied research, consulting and developing entrepreneurship models in order to improve local livelihoods in displaced communities. Lamya continues to engage with various research centres including the Centre for Palestine Studies (SOAS), Centre for Forced Migration and Displacement (SOAS) and the London International Development Centre. She is also the Editor with the Journal for Internal Displacement and currently working on her PhD dissertation which investigates issues of land, agriculture, food sovereignty and environment in the context of occupied Palestinian territories." 

        CALL FOR PAPER (SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JANUARY 2014)

FORCED MIGRATION AND DISPLACEMENT: IMPACT ON WOMEN

Guest Editor: Seema Shekhawat

*JANUARY 2014 EDITION*

Submission Deadline:  15 October 2013

(NB: General submissions are accepted alongside Special Issue)

The Journal of Internal Displacement (JID) is a scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of internally displaced persons through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. Our mandate is to raise the agenda and prioritize internally displaced people concerns through scholastic exchange of information. With eighteen (18) international editorial team members, JID supports open and free online access.

Displacement is an all-pervasive phenomenon and the post-Cold War world is confronting this situation on an unprecedented scale, more so in the developing world. Exposed to atrocities and difficulties in conflict situations or natural calamities, civilians are forced to flee their homelands. The flight nevertheless does not bring an end to their problems. A long struggle for survival, settlement and return await the displaced at the places they land. 

When displacement is brought to the civilian population, the group as a whole bears the consequences. There is also a context of specificity regarding the experiences of different categories. This is especially the case with regard to those who otherwise are most vulnerable within the larger group. For instance, women experience consequences of displacement more severely than men. On the one hand, they share common experiences with the group as a major constituent of the civilian population. On the other hand, there is gender specificity due to socially ascribed gendered roles. The gender-specific experience for displaced women is rooted in the culture of discrimination that denies women equal status with men and, among other things, deprives them of basic rights such as access to education, mobility and participation in decision-making. 

Displaced women confront variegated consequences of violence- economic, socio-cultural, physical, sexual and psychological. Their displacement-related experiences are specific due to factors including, but not limited to, dilapidated camp conditions, poor health facilities, lack of privacy and proper sanitation facilities, and constraints on their mobility. In the absence of their men folk, they are responsible for feeding the family and rearing children even when aid and assistance is  meagre or unavailable. The breakdown of social fabric and disintegration of families affect them adversely. They may become victims of sexual exploitation which range from rape to forced prostitution and trafficking. Displacement may also lead to increase in domestic violence and, as a result, women  confront gender-based violence perpetrated by male members of family.

During displacement, women and men deal differently with trauma of dislocation, renegotiating identities and rebuilding social networks. Although the initial impact of violent displacement is comparatively severe for women than men, the former generally adapt more quickly to their new environment, finding new spaces through informal support networks to meet needs of their families. The displaced women as actors in their own survival may show resilience in adverse conditions and in the process become empowered. Hence, though displacement brings numerous sufferings to women it may have some positive implications.

It is against this backdrop that JID seeks to stimulate discursive dialogue about nature, characteristics, and experiences of displaced women by inviting a diverse range of scholars, practitioners and policy makers for Volume 5 Issue 1, scheduled for release in January 2014. We invite submissions that examine gender and displacement with respect to the following list of themes which is not exhaustive:

  • Gender and Displacement
  • Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement and Displaced Women
  • Camps and Displaced women
  • Violence and Displaced Women
  • Survival, Resilience and Coping Mechanisms
  • Role of international, national and local organizations in providing gender-specific aid and assistance
  • Gender sensitivity in policy making for the displaced 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

  • Articles: 20?30 pages (maximum) single space with  150 words abstract and 5 keywords
  • Book Review: 3-4 pages
  • Commentaries: 6-8 pages
  • JID accepts all reference styles as long as they are standard and consistent
  • Submission must be original (not published elsewhere) and in Microsoft word
  • Submit a one-page cover letter with author?s name, address, email, phone number and 200 words (max) bio

Email submission to:   internaldisplacement@gmail.com no later than October 15, 2013.

For more information see the ?Author?s Guidelines? by visiting: http://journalinternaldisplacement.webs.com/ 

Download PDF

              CALL FOR PAPER (SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JULY 2013)                                       Release date is set for 20 July 2013

 FORCED MIGRATION AND DISPLACEMENT IN SOMALIA AND SOMALI INHABITED TERRITORIES

Guest Editor: Melissa Fellin

*JULY 2013 EDITION*

Deadline (EXTENDED): May 15, 2013

The Journal of Internal Displacement (JID) is a scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of internally displaced persons through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. Our mandate is to raise the agenda and prioritize internally displaced people concerns through scholastic exchange of information. With eighteen (18) international editorial team members, JID supports open and free online access.

Somalia has experienced prolonged armed conflict since the beginning of the war in the north (1988) and the south (1991); however, there is little known about the actual experiences of the conflict, the related environmental disasters, and the uprooting and movement of Somali individuals and families both within Somalia and Somali inhabited regions, including Ogaden in Ethiopia and the North Eastern Province in Kenya. In fact, generations of Somalis have experienced often multiple displacements from their homes and villages throughout colonialism, during resistance movements and conflicts over disputed territories. In an attempt to link the past and the present, this special issue on Somalia seeks to examine the histories, memories and present day experiences of dislocation as a result of colonialism/imperialism, drought, poverty, and prolonged armed conflict. As well, the issue will highlight the social and historical agency of the Somali people through colonial and post-colonial resistances, grass-roots movements, and peace building and reconciliation.  

It is against this backdrop that JID seeks to stimulate inclusive and discursive dialogue from the variety of interested scholars, practitioners and policy makers around the nature, characteristics, and experiences of forced migration and displacement in Somalia and Somali inhabited territories both in the past and in the present for Volume 3 Issue 2 scheduled for release in July 2013. We invite submissions that examine diverse perspectives on the above issues with respect to the following list of themes which is not exhaustive:

 
Colonialism and imperialism
Colonial and post-colonial resistances
War and violence
Environment, conflict and displacement
Peace building and reconciliation 
International relations and diplomacy
Gender, power and control
Non-governmental organizations, humanitarian assistance, and grass roots organizations/movements
 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
Articles:  20 – 30 pages (maximum) single space with 150 words abstract and 5 keywords
Book Review: 3-4 pages
Commentaries: 6-8 pages
JID accepts all reference styles as long as they are standard and consistent
Submission must be original (not published elsewhere) and in Microsoft word
Submit a one-page cover letter with author’s name, address, email, phone number and 200 words (max) bio

Email submission to: jid@evresearch.ca no later than April 30, 2013.

For more information see the “Author’s Guidelines” by visiting: http://journalinternaldisplacement.webs.com/ 

The Journal of Internal Displacement (JID) is a scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of internally displaced persons through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. Our mandate is to raise the agenda and prioritize internally displaced people concerns through scholastic exchange of information. With eighteen (18) international editorial team members, JID supports open and free online access.

Somalia has experienced prolonged armed conflict since the beginning of the war in the north (1988) and the south (1991); however, there is little known about the actual experiences of the conflict, the related environmental disasters, and the uprooting and movement of Somali individuals and families both within Somalia and Somali inhabited regions, including Ogaden in Ethiopia and the North Eastern Province in Kenya. In fact, generations of Somalis have experienced often multiple displacements from their homes and villages throughout colonialism, during resistance movements and conflicts over disputed territories. In an attempt to link the past and the present, this special issue on Somalia seeks to examine the histories, memories and present day experiences of dislocation as a result of colonialism/imperialism, drought, poverty, and prolonged armed conflict. As well, the issue will highlight the social and historical agency of the Somali people through colonial and post-colonial resistances, grass-roots movements, and peace building and reconciliation.  

It is against this backdrop that JID seeks to stimulate inclusive and discursive dialogue from the variety of interested scholars, practitioners and policy makers around the nature, characteristics, and experiences of forced migration and displacement in Somalia and Somali inhabited territories both in the past and in the present for Volume 3 Issue 2 scheduled for release in July 2013. We invite submissions that examine diverse perspectives on the above issues with respect to the following list of themes which is not exhaustive:

  • Colonialism and imperialism
  • Colonial and post-colonial resistances
  • War and violence
  • Environment, conflict and displacement
  • Peace building and reconciliation
  • International relations and diplomacy
  • Gender, power and control
  • Non-governmental organizations, humanitarian assistance, and grass roots organizations/movements

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

  • Articles:  20 – 30 pages (maximum) single space with 150 words abstract and 5 keywords
  • Book Review: 3-4 pages
  • Commentaries: 6-8 pages
  • JID accepts all reference styles as long as they are standard and consistent
  • Submission must be original (not published elsewhere) and in Microsoft word
  • Submit a one-page cover letter with author’s name, address, email, phone number and 200 words (max) bio

Email submission to: internaldisplacement@gmail.com no later than May 15, 2013.

For more information see the “Author’s Guidelines” by visiting: http://journalinternaldisplacement.webs.com/

Download Link

VACANCY: ASSISTANT EDITOR (VOLUNTEER) - CLOSED

POSITION OVERVIEW

The Journal of Internal Displacement (JID) is looking for a motivated person with suitable editorial/research experience to assist in the production of its professional quality journal. The JID is a refereed journal which appears two (2) times annually. It is produced by EV Research Inc., under the editorship of its founder Veronica Fynn. The successful applicant will assume the role of Assistant Editor, and work under the supervision of the co-editors. The duties include liaison with authors, referees and JID Editorial Board; handling copyright agreements; assisting in the management of the website, open access publication, contributing to the production of each issue by working on the layout, assisting with proof-reading and general promotion of the journal with libraries and other potential clients. The role would provide valuable professional development opportunities for a Higher Degree Research Student or recent graduate interested in forced migration.

This is a volunteer position of up to 10 hours per week.

The JID, established July 2009, is a scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of displaced populations through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. JID is a product of EV Research Inc., and it promotes free and open access. Thanks to the generous voluntary contribution from the advisory board and editorial team.

The JID values diversity, inclusion and has an equal opportunity in employment policy. We actively encourages applicants from researchers in the Global South, especially women and persons identifying as minority, to apply.

To apply, submit your resume and cover letter to Veronica Fynn, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Internal Displacement, jid@evresearch.ca by 28 February 2013. Download PDF 

           CALL FOR PAPER - (SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JULY 2012)                           Release date is set for August 15, 2012 

FORCED MIGRATION AND DISPLACEMENT DURING THE ARAB SPRING
*JULY 2012 EDITION*
Deadline: Sunday, April 15, 2012

The Journal of Internal Displacement (JID) is a scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of internally displaced persons through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. Our mandate is to raise the agenda and prioritize internally displaced people concerns through scholastic exchange of information. With eighteen (18) international editorial team members, JID supports open and free online access.

A wave of resistance sprung up in the Arab world since 17 December 2010 when Mohamed Bouazizi, a Tunisia street vendor, burned himself to death in protest against municipal police’s humiliation and mistreatment toward him. Ever since, some 17 countries in North Africa and the Middle East have been experiencing violent protests in favour of regime change.  Although, there is limited statistical facts on the actual amount of forced displacement occurring as a direct result of the crises in these countries, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates as at January 2011, zero (0) internally displaced persons in Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Western Sahara, yet 1.3 million in Iraq; 1.6 million in Sudan; and 220,000 in Yemen. The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) provides statistics for seven (7) of the seventeen (17) countries in the Middle East. For those countries that are part of the Arab Spring, IDMC estimates around 2.8 million in Iraq; 200,000 in Libya; 76,000 in Lebanon; 160,000 in Palestine; 4.2 million in Sudan; 433,000 in Syria; 250,000 in Yemen and undetermined in Algeria. It is obvious that statistics do not seem to capture the true picture of the impact, enormity and severity of forced migration taking place within and across borders.

It is against this backdrop that JID seeks to stimulate inclusive and discursive dialogue from the variety of interested scholars, practitioners and policy makers around the scope, nature and characteristics of forced migration and displacement during the Arab Spring for its Volume 2, Number 2 scheduled for release in July 2012. We invite submissions that examine diverse perspectives on the above issues with respect to the following list of themes which is not exhaustive:

•    Conflict resolution
•    Post-conflict peace building
•    Ethnic/Religious uprising
•    Socio-political revolution
•    Democratic reform
•    Civil/Media resistance
•    Terrorism, war and violence
•    International relations and diplomacy
•    Gender disparity, power and control
•    Humanitarian assistance

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Articles: 
20 – 30 pages (maximum) single space with 150 words abstract and 5 keywords
Book Review:
3-4 pages
Commentaries:
6-8 pages

**JID accepts all reference style as long as they are standard and consistent
**Submission must be original (not published elsewhere) and in Microsoft word
**Submit a one-page cover letter with author’s name, address, email, phone number and 200 words (max) bio

Email submission to:
internaldisplacement@gmail.com no later than Sunday, April 15, 2012.

Download PDF

SUBMISSION TO JANUARY 2012 ISSUE

The next issue of JID is scheduled for publication in January 2012. To be considered for this issue kindly submit your article to jid@evresearch.ca no later than November 15, 2011

PRINT COPIES ARE IN - BE THE FIRST TO ORDER

Print copies of the Journal of Internal Displacement Volume 1 Issue 1 & 2 are ready. Be the first to order your copy now. Click the subscription tab for more info.

JID Accepts Submissions in French and Spanish

Having received many submissions from authors whose first language is either French or English, we are pleased to announce that as of today, June 30, 2011, the Journal of Internal Displacement will be accepting submissions in Spanish and French. We hope to expand our capacity to include Arabic, Mandarin/Cantonese and Swahili at later time.

6th Commonwealth Research Symposium on Teacher Mobility, Recruitment and Migration

6th Commonwealth Research Symposium on Teacher Mobility, Recruitment and Migration

Host: UNESCO Institute for Capacity Building in Africa (IICBA), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Date: 8-9 June 2011

Download PDF

Click for more info

             CALL FOR PAPERS: JULY 2011 EDITION

DEADLINE (EXTENDED): FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 2011
Internal Displacement: Definitions, Scope, Theories and Concepts
JULY 2011 EDITION

The Journal of Internal Displacement (JID) is a scholarly and inter-disciplinary platform for raising the profile of internally displaced persons through discussions, critical dialogue, emerging themes, reflections and explorations on a wide range of topics and regions around the globe. Our Inaugural Volume Issue 2- Definitions, Scope, Theories and Concepts: International Perspectives will be launched in January 2011.
 
The term “Internally Displaced People” (IDPs), unlike “Refugee”, is not only relatively new but has become the central focuses of scholarly and non-scholarly debates around the globe. The questions of (1) who should be included in the definition of internal displacement, (ii) whether and Internal Displacement Law should be enacted, and (iii) whose responsibility it is to protect IDPs are but few of the many on-going debates.  Academics, civil society groups, humanitarian agencies, refugee practitioners, lawyers and policy makers have created numerous camps, each defining and understanding the concept from their disciplines. Some promote a generic definition of internal displacement; others push for a distinct categorization of displacement, yet another argues that one size does not fit all. For example, some researchers have suggested a distinction between development-induced displacement and conflict-induced displacement, and the exclusion of the former from statistics on internal displacement.  
 
To stimulate inclusive discussion and dialogue from the variety of interested scholars, practitioners and policy makers, JID aims to explore diverse perspectives on the definitions, scope, theoretical, and conceptual lenses of internal displacement with particular Focus on Africa. We invite submissions that examine the above issues with respect to the following list of themes which is not exhaustive:

•    Socio-Economic Displacement
•    Development Induced Displacement
•    Climate Change Displacement
•    Africa’s New IDPs Convention
•    Conflict Induced Displacement
•    State Sovereignty
•    Responsibility to Protect
•    Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
•    Articles:  20 – 30 pages (maximum) single space with 150 words abstract
•    Book Review: 3-4 pages
•    Commentaries: 6-8 pages
•    JID accepts all reference style as long as they are standard and consistent
•    Submission must be original (not published elsewhere) and in Microsoft word
•    Submit a one-page cover letter with author’s name, address, email, phone number and 200 words (max) bio

Email submission to internaldisplacement@gmail.com no later than Friday, February 25th, 2011.
For more information visit: http://journalinternaldisplacement.webs.com/

Download CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS: CLOSED
INAUGURAL VOLUME: Internal Displacement: Definitions, Scope, Theories and Concepts
CALL FOR EDITORS/REVIEWERS: CLOSED

The Journal of Internal Displacement is seeking editors, reviewers, and proof-readers with keen interest in the multi-faceted nature of internal displacement to join our global Editorial Team. 

Emerging scholars (especially females) from resource poor communities are strongly encouraged to apply.

To apply:please email (jid@vresearch.ca) your resume along with a paragraph stating why you should be accepted.

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NEWS ALERT

ATTENTION: JID NEW EMAIL ADDRESS

Please note that our email address has changed to:


internaldisplacement [at] gmail [dot] com.


As at today, 20 December 2014 ALL correspondence should be directed to


internaldisplacement [at] gmail [dot] com.


Thank you.


UPCOMING

International Conference on Migration, Social disadvantage, and Health, February 11-13, 2015. Click here for more info

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: AN edited volume entitled "Gendering Conflict and Peace Making" Submission Deadline 15 June 2014. For more information, contact Dr. Seema Shekhawat (sashekhawat@gmail.com)

***DEADLINE EXTENDED *** CALL FOR PAPERS, SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JULY 2014: Understanding Israeli Practices of Forced Displacement and Settler Colonialism in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Submission Deadline: 1 MAY 2014 Download CFP (CLOSED)

CALL FOR PAPERS: Wudpecker Journal of Sociology and Anthropology (WJSA) is currently accepting manuscripts for publication. For more details click

CALL FOR PAPER, SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JANUARY 2014  Forced Migration and Displacement: Impact on Women Submission Deadline: 15 October 2013 Download CFP (CLOSED)

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CALL FOR PAPER, SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JULY 2013 (CLOSED)

Forced Migration and Displacement in Somalia and Somali Inhabited Territories

Submission Deadline (EXTENDED): 15 MAY 2013 Download PDF

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VACANCY: Assistant Editor (Volunteer) CLOSED

Deadline: 28 February 2013

Download PDF

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VOTE FOR EV RESEARCH as RISING STAR in GLOBAL HEALTH (CLOSED) http/bit.ly/ITGrkn

CALL FOR PAPER, SPECIAL ISSUE FOR JULY 2012 (CLOSED)

Forced Migration & Displacement During the Arab Spring

Submission deadline: April 15, 2012

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Volume 2, Number 1 is scheduled for release on January 15, 2012

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Next Issue of JID is scheduled for publication in January 2012.

Submit your article by November 15, 2011

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BE THE FIRST TO ORDER

JID PRINT COPIES ARE IN!

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           RELEASED

   Volume 1, Number 2

       August 15, 2011

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Click for more info

***6th Commonwealth Research Symposium on Teacher Mobility, Recruitment and Migratio***

UNESCO Institute for Capacity Building in Africa, Addis Ababa Ethiopia

8-9 June 2011

Click for more Info

****DEADLINE EXTENDED****

JID INAUGURAL VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2

Definitions, Scopes, Theories and Concepts: FOCUS ON AFRICA

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: APRIL 1, 2011


JID INAUGURAL ISSUE LAUNCHED JANUARY 15, 2011

Volume 1, Number 1: Definitions, Scopes, Theories and Concepts

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